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Triggered by the shimmering Hong Kong’s skyline, Ahmed Elbeshlawy remembers the Sheriff from Clint Eastwood’s movie "Unforgiven" asking Strawberry Alice - a prostitute with whom he was arguing after beating a suspect: “Innocent of what?”. “Free of what?”, Ahmed asks the 21st century's “free thinker” sunk in the world of political correctness, capitalism, multiculturalism, immigration and gender issues.

From smoking in public places and taking selfies to historical figures or characters from movies, his twenty-five essays drive the reader through contemporary social phenomena, stirring literary tropes, poignant cinematic moments and subjective instances shaped by different histories and carrying forward mixed feelings, beliefs and illusions.

To make sense out of these, Ahmed’s writing destabilizes what is usually taken as common sense, unpacking thoughts of European philosophers like Lacan, Derrida, Adorno and Žižek, as well as titans of literature like Shakespeare and Kafka.
Price: £ 25 + shipping
Published: March 2019
ISBN: 978-1-9996138-1-5
Paperback: 235 pages
Size: 14 x 21.6 cm
(5.5 x 8.5 in)
Ahmed Elbeshlawy
Twenty-Five Meditations on Writing
and Subjectivity
Triggered by the shimmering Hong Kong’s skyline, Ahmed Elbeshlawy remembers the Sheriff from Clint Eastwood’s movie "Unforgiven" asking Strawberry Alice - a prostitute with whom he was arguing after beating a suspect: “Innocent of what?”. “Free of what?”, Ahmed asks the 21st century's “free thinker” sunk in the world of political correctness, capitalism, multiculturalism, immigration and gender issues.

From smoking in public places and taking selfies to historical figures or characters from movies, his twenty-five essays drive the reader through contemporary social phenomena, stirring literary tropes, poignant cinematic moments and subjective instances shaped by different histories and carrying forward mixed feelings, beliefs and illusions.

To make sense out of these, Ahmed’s writing destabilizes what is usually taken as common sense, unpacking thoughts of European philosophers like Lacan, Derrida, Adorno and Žižek, as well as titans of literature like Shakespeare and Kafka.
Triggered by the shimmering Hong Kong’s skyline, Ahmed Elbeshlawy remembers the Sheriff from Clint Eastwood’s movie "Unforgiven" asking Strawberry Alice - a prostitute with whom he was arguing after beating a suspect: “Innocent of what?”. “Free of what?”, Ahmed asks the 21st century's “free thinker” sunk in the world of political correctness, capitalism, multiculturalism, immigration and gender issues.

From smoking in public places and taking selfies to historical figures or characters from movies, his twenty-five essays drive the reader through contemporary social phenomena, stirring literary tropes, poignant cinematic moments and subjective instances shaped by different histories and carrying forward mixed feelings, beliefs and illusions.

To make sense out of these, Ahmed’s writing destabilizes what is usually taken as common sense, unpacking thoughts of European philosophers like Lacan, Derrida, Adorno and Žižek, as well as titans of literature like Shakespeare and Kafka.
Triggered by the shimmering Hong Kong’s skyline, Ahmed Elbeshlawy remembers the Sheriff from Clint Eastwood’s movie "Unforgiven" asking Strawberry Alice - a prostitute with whom he was arguing after beating a suspect: “Innocent of what?”. “Free of what?”, Ahmed asks the 21st century's “free thinker” sunk in the world of political correctness, capitalism, multiculturalism, immigration and gender issues.

From smoking in public places and taking selfies to historical figures or characters from movies, his twenty-five essays drive the reader through contemporary social phenomena, stirring literary tropes, poignant cinematic moments and subjective instances shaped by different histories and carrying forward mixed feelings, beliefs and illusions.

To make sense out of these, Ahmed’s writing destabilizes what is usually taken as common sense, unpacking thoughts of European philosophers like Lacan, Derrida, Adorno and Žižek, as well as titans of literature like Shakespeare and Kafka.
Twenty-Five Meditations on Writing
and Subjectivity
Twenty-Five Meditations on Writing
and Subjectivity
Twenty-Five Meditations on Writing
and Subjectivity
Ahmed Elbeshlawy is a scholar of comparative literature. He is the author of "Woman in Lars von Trier’s Cinema" (Palgrave, 2016), "America in Literature and Film" (Routledge, 2011), and various articles and book chapters in "The Palgrave Handbook of Literature and the City" (2016), "Sexuality and Culture" (2014), "The Comparatist" (2008), "Scope" (2008), and "fe/male bodies" (2005, 2006).
Ahmed Elbeshlawy is a scholar of comparative literature. He is the author of "Woman in Lars von Trier’s Cinema" (Palgrave, 2016), "America in Literature and Film" (Routledge, 2011), and various articles and book chapters in "The Palgrave Handbook of Literature and the City" (2016), "Sexuality and Culture" (2014), "The Comparatist" (2008), "Scope" (2008), and "fe/male bodies" (2005, 2006).
Ahmed Elbeshlawy is a scholar of comparative literature. He is the author of "Woman in Lars von Trier’s Cinema" (Palgrave, 2016), "America in Literature and Film" (Routledge, 2011), and various articles and book chapters in "The Palgrave Handbook of Literature and the City" (2016), "Sexuality and Culture" (2014), "The Comparatist" (2008), "Scope" (2008), and "fe/male bodies" (2005, 2006).
Ahmed Elbeshlawy is a scholar of comparative literature. He is the author of "Woman in Lars von Trier’s Cinema" (Palgrave, 2016), "America in Literature and Film" (Routledge, 2011), and various articles and book chapters in "The Palgrave Handbook of Literature and the City" (2016), "Sexuality and Culture" (2014), "The Comparatist" (2008), "Scope" (2008), and "fe/male bodies" (2005, 2006).
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Endorsements
On the very first page of this book, Ahmed Elbeshlawy writes that it is "inspired by the city of Hong Kong". Twenty Five Meditations on Writing and Subjectivity is a book we will have to learn to read, but I might predict that Ahmed will turn into something of an Iain Sinclair of the 21st century, and instead of London Hong Kong will be his resource, his inspiration and his invention.
______   Rex Butler, Professor, Monash University, Melbourne
Twenty-Five Meditations on Writing and Subjectivity offers a vigorous exploration of the psychoanalytic conception of subjectivity through the problem of writing. Through its perceptive theoretical engagement, the work uncovers how the problem of subjectivity functions as the essential problem in the modern world. Elbeshlawy’s book is a joy to read and chock full of illuminating moments.
______   Todd McGowan, Professor, University of Vermont
Elbeshlawy brings his distinctive voice to the cosmopolitan Hong Kong’s anglophone literary scene with this volume of prose and poetry. Channelling Roland Barthes’ Mythologies, he references filmmakers, philosophers, critics and novelists. This eclectic collection of cultural criticism and poetry speaks to readers about the past in an idiom that reflects its urgency for the present moment.
______   Gina Marchetti, Professor, University of Hong Kong
______   Cecilia Kak, Director - English Studies, Hong Kong University SPACE
Twenty-Five Meditations on Writing and Subjectivity records its writer’s personal experience - and invention - of Hong Kong in the subtlest of ways. On the one hand, the passionate poems insinuate the personal into the critical essays; on the other, the insightful critical writing - which problematizes the notion of writing itself - infuses the poetical, giving it a gutsy impersonal touch and a distinctive social tinge.
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